FAQ

FAQ

 

Q: Why treat my water?

A: The demand for cleaner, clearer water is growing…

Especially in homes, where people expect the best water possible. Sales of bottled water and pitcher filters continue to rise. But these are only stop-gap measures since impurities can affect more than the water your family drinks.

Water falls pure from the skies. But as it makes its way to your home, water collects a variety of impurities. Some, including iron, calcium, and magnesium, are natural contaminants. More threatening are the thousands of man-made contaminants such as pesticides, mercury, arsenic, and petrochemicals. It’s these impurities that can affect its taste, smell, and quite possibly, even its safety.  Read more…

 

Q: Why does my water smell of rotten eggs?

A: The sulfur smell in well water is due to the presence of the gas contaminant, hydrogen sulfide (H2S). This gas is a common contaminant of well water and is usually produced by certain types of bacteria as a waste product. Hydrogen sulfide gas produces an offensive “rotten egg” or “sulfur water” odor and taste in the water. Two forms of sulfur are commonly found in drinking water supplies: sulfate and hydrogen sulfide.

In some cases, the odor may be noticeable only when the water is initially turned on or when hot water is run. Heat forces the gas into the air which may cause the odor to be especially offensive in a shower. Occasionally, a hot water heater is a source of hydrogen sulfide odor. The magnesium corrosion control rod present in many hot water heaters can chemically reduce naturally occurring sulfates to hydrogen sulfide.  Read more…

 

Q: My water tastes bitter. Why? What are the potential health effects?

A: Sulfate minerals can cause scale buildup in water pipes similar to other minerals and may be associated with a bitter taste in water that can have a laxative effect on humans and young livestock. Read more…

 

Q: Why do I have red stains on my sinks and toilets?

A: Iron, and to a lesser extent manganese, frequently occur in the rock and soil of the earth’s crust. Shallow and deep aquifers often contain appreciable amounts of iron. The familiar reddish brown iron stains on sinks and toilets and the similar stains on freshly laundered clothes are caused by iron. Manganese causes similar stains but they are generally black or dark gray.

Iron (and manganese) occurs in many forms. In order to facilitate iron removal, it’s important to know what type of iron you have in your water supply. Read more…

 

Q: Why do I have color in the water?

A: Tannins are a byproduct of decayed vegetation. The decayed vegetation produces humic acid in shallow, swampy water. Iron can complex with organic compounds in humic acid to form tannin. The iron in the complex gives tannin water its characteristic yellowish to tea-colored color. Read more…

 

Q: What are the health risks for consuming contaminated water?

A: Cryptosporidiosis became a reportable illness in Washington in 2001. Originally considered a parasite of animals, reptiles and birds, it first was detected as a source of illness for humans in 1976. Health officials now believe Cryptosporidium has been causing human illnesses for a long time, but it was overlooked due to difficulties in testing and diagnosis.

Cryptosporidium occurs in the feces of infected animals or humans. It is environmentally resistant and may survive outside the body for long periods of time. To become infected, a person must consume contaminated food or water, including from streams or rivers. Read more…

 

Q: What is hard water?

A: Hard water is aptly named because it makes so many tasks in the home harder. Housework takes longer with hard water. Clothes are not as clean after washing in hard water. Glassware comes out of the dishwasher spotty and scratched.

Hard water is tough on the budget too. Energy bills are higher and expensive appliances like water heaters, washing machines, and dishwashers wear out faster. The problems associated with hard water can be solved by installing a state-of-the-art water softener. Read more…

 

Q: Did flooding have any effect on my Water Treatment Equipment ?

A: Water softeners, filtration equipment and drinking water devices should be treated as any other appliance or fixture in your home and should be inspected by a qualified, trained technician if they came into contact with flood water. Remember to have this inspection done before using the water treatment device. Read more…

 

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